Fourth Wave

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A new generation of feminists that society needs. We want to help anyone who identifies as a women feel empowered and important.Equality for everybody of any race, creed, color, sexuality, and gender. Be who you are because everyone harbors greatness within them.


Anonymous asked: Why do you think so many people say that "feminism isn't needed anymore" "Rape culture isn't real" "You should be called an equalist instead" I feel like that the only way they could possible believe that if they haven't been reading/watching the news. There seems to be a new case of injustice against women everyday. Even the media reporting these cases doesn't seem to take them seriously...


Answer:

I feel like people feel this way because either they’re not exposed to it, they are misunderstood, they don’t want to think it’s real, they are in denial, or they’re just ignorant. It baffles me that even though most people I know are feminist and are aware of women’s issues, a majority of people are still living in the dark. we just have to keep on fighting the fight and make them see what’s been going on in front of their faces. -Skye

— 2 hours ago with 11 notes
Though our first issue is out on August 15th, Flower Crown is now accepting pieces for our second issue in September. The theme is Celebrity Skin. This issue will focus on media driven images of women (the good and the bad), celebrity culture from an intersectional feminist standpoint, body image, female stock characters (Strong Female™, Sapphire, Ingenue, Jezebel, etc) our favorite TV shows/films/music/actresses/singers/etc, problematic faves, media representation or lack thereof…” 
Please send submissions to shanice@flowercrown.com!
We do not accept fiction pieces at this time.
 ❀❀❀FlowerCrownMag❀❀❀

Though our first issue is out on August 15th, Flower Crown is now accepting pieces for our second issue in September. The theme is Celebrity Skin. This issue will focus on media driven images of women (the good and the bad), celebrity culture from an intersectional feminist standpoint, body image, female stock characters (Strong Female™, Sapphire, Ingenue, Jezebel, etc) our favorite TV shows/films/music/actresses/singers/etc, problematic faves, media representation or lack thereof…” 

Please send submissions to shanice@flowercrown.com!

We do not accept fiction pieces at this time.

 ❀❀❀FlowerCrownMag❀❀❀

— 2 hours ago with 5 notes
#fourthwave  #feminist  #submission 
Anonymous asked: Aren't a lot of old feminist from the 70s calling the new feminist movement ridiculous because it's no longer what feminists initially wanted?


Answer:

Well, they fought a slightly different fight. But in the core, its’ all about equality for all people. -Skye

— 2 hours ago with 4 notes
Sexual Harassment explained in easy to follow comic form →

Do you have a male friend or relative who is ostensibly a good guy, but has a hard time grasping the nature of sexual harassment that women endure? Use this comic as a visual aid to help them understand better. Won’t hurt; might help.

— 2 hours ago with 11 notes
#feminism  #feminist  #submission 
war-allthetime asked: hi! I feel like you would understand my frustration on a certain subject. I made a post about people not putting up with boys who do a bunch of shitty things towards women. Every once in awhile someone reblogs it and comments "oh but you should treat anyone that way" like yeah that's true but how women are treated by men has been erased time and time again. "Oh human rights instead of women's rights" like this is why we need a movement in the first place. I just feel like you would understand.


Answer:

People are so frustrating sometimes! But i’m glad that there are people like you to outshine the people like this.-Skye

— 2 hours ago with 2 notes
mintrovert asked: I'm so happy i've found this blog. I'm really only finding my feet as a feminist but this whole #womenagainstfeminism has really got me riled up. Can you recommend any books or theorists in particular?


Answer:

I’m happy you found our blog too! For books, I recommend Girls to the front by Sara Marcus, Slut! by Laura Tanenbaum, Feminism is for Everybody by Bell Hooks, and The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan. For theorist, most people go for Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, and other powerful feminist in history. My personal favourite feminist icons are Kathleen Hanna, and all the strong women in my life. Sometimes the best theorists are the people around you. Hope I could help:) -Skye

— 2 hours ago with 7 notes
exoticfever:

This post is the eighth in a series of posts I am making about books by black authors who impacted me. (Other posts are below.) Today’s book is Blues Legacies and Black Feminism by Angela Davis. I have to start this post by utterly geeking out and letting you know that my copy of this is signed, and if my house was burning down this is one of two things I would take with me while fleeing the building. A lot of cultural attention is paid to the feminist contribution of white women in music. Riot grrrl was incredible and important to many of us, but was predominantly white. Often absent from discussions of feminist advancement through music are the voices of black women. This book tells the story of three in particular: Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday. Angela Davis is a brilliant activist and scholar, well known for her seminal work Women, Race and Class (it’s a must-read). She is also outspoken on issues such as the prison industrial complex and the situation in Palestine. In this book, she uncovers the ways in which blues artists challenged domestic violence, racism, and gender stereotyping. It is a page turner, offering up snippets of lyrics throughout to illustrate how transgressive and subversive these artists were. Davis gives them a due they should have been afforded long ago, but hey - much of history does not have a light shined upon it, including music history. If you are passionate about music and feminism, please pick up this book!

exoticfever:

This post is the eighth in a series of posts I am making about books by black authors who impacted me. (Other posts are below.) Today’s book is Blues Legacies and Black Feminism by Angela Davis. I have to start this post by utterly geeking out and letting you know that my copy of this is signed, and if my house was burning down this is one of two things I would take with me while fleeing the building. 

A lot of cultural attention is paid to the feminist contribution of white women in music. Riot grrrl was incredible and important to many of us, but was predominantly white. Often absent from discussions of feminist advancement through music are the voices of black women. This book tells the story of three in particular: Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday. 

Angela Davis is a brilliant activist and scholar, well known for her seminal work Women, Race and Class (it’s a must-read). She is also outspoken on issues such as the prison industrial complex and the situation in Palestine. In this book, she uncovers the ways in which blues artists challenged domestic violence, racism, and gender stereotyping. It is a page turner, offering up snippets of lyrics throughout to illustrate how transgressive and subversive these artists were. Davis gives them a due they should have been afforded long ago, but hey - much of history does not have a light shined upon it, including music history. If you are passionate about music and feminism, please pick up this book!

— 1 day ago with 22 notes